Illuminati

The Illuminati means "enlightened" there are many branch which are found within the mystery schools and many secret societies. It's often confused and limited to Adam Weishaupt and the Bavarian Illuminati.
The Illuminati simply means “enlightened” there are many branches which are found within the mystery schools and many secret societies. It’s often confused and limited to Adam Weishaupt and the Bavarian Illuminati.

“It was not my intention to doubt that, the Doctrines of the Illuminati, and principles of Jacobinism had not spread in the United States. On the contrary,  no one is more truly satisfied of this fact than I am.”-George Washington Letter, October 24, 1798 (click here for full text of letter)

“I feel the weight of the responsibility resting upon me, for in the Illuminati, to preach is a very small part of the duties to be performed.” – Fundamental Laws A Report of the 68th Convocation of the Rose Cross Order (1917) by Clymer R Swinburne pg. 121


The designation illuminati was also in use from the 14th century by the Brethren of the Free Spirit, and in the 15th century was assumed by other enthusiasts who claimed that the illuminating light came, not by being communicated from an authoritative but secret source, but from within, the result of exalted consciousness, or "enlightenment". Alumbrados of Spain To the former class belong the alumbrados of Spain. The historian Marcelino Menendez y Pelayo found the name as early as 1492 (in the form iluminados, 1498), but traced them to a Gnostic origin, and thought their views were promoted in Spain through influences from Italy. One of their earliest leaders, born in Salamanca, a laborer's daughter known as La Beata de Piedrahita, came under the notice of the Inquisition in 1511, as claiming to hold colloquies with Jesus and the Virgin Mary; some high patronage saved her from a rigorous denunciation. (Menendez Pelayo, Los Heterodoxos Espa–oles, 1881, vol. V.). Ignatius Loyola, while studying at Salamanca in 1527, was brought before an ecclesiastical commission on a charge of sympathy with the alumbrados, but escaped with an admonition. Illumines of France The movement (under the name of Illumines) seems to have reached France from Seville in 1623, and attained some following in Picardy when joined (1634) by Pierce Guerin, cure of Saint-Georges de Roye, whose followers, known as Gurinets, were suppressed in 1635. A century later, another, more obscure body of Illumines came to light in the south of France in 1722, and appears to have lingered till 1794, having affinities with those known contemporaneously in Britain as 'French Prophets', an offshoot of the Camisards. Rosicrucians A different class were the Rosicrucians, who claimed to originate in 1407, but rose into notice in 1614 when their main text Fama Fraternitatis appeared; a secret society, that claimed to combine the possession of esoteric principles of religion with the mysteries of alchemy. Their positions are embodied in three anonymous treatises of 1614 (mentioned in Richard and Giraud, Dictionnaire universel des sciences ecclesiastiques, Paris 1825), as well as in the Confessio Fraternitatis of 1615. Rosicrucians also claimed heritage from the Knights Templar. Martinists Later, the title Illuminati was applied to the French Martinists which had been founded in 1754 by Martinez Pasqualis, and to their imitators the Russian Martinists, headed about 1790 by Professor Schwartz of Moscow; both were occultist cabalists and allegorists, absorbing eclectic ideas from Jakob Boehme and Emanuel Swedenborg.
“ILLUMINATI (Lat. Illuimare) a designation illuminati  in use from the 15th century, and applied to, or assumed by,  by  enthusiasts of types distinct form each other, according  as the ” light”  claimed was veiwed as directly  communicated from a higher but source, or as due to a clarified and exalted condition of the human intelligence. To the former class belong the alumbrados of Spain.  Marcelino Menendez y Pelayo found the name about 1492 (in the form aluminados, 1498), but traces them to a Gnostic origin, and thought their views were promoted in Spain through influences from Italy. One of their earliest leaders, born in Salamanca, a laborer’s daughter known as La Beata de Piedrahita, came under the notice of the Inquisition in 1511, as claiming to hold colloquies with our Lord  and the Virgin; having high patrons, no decision was taken against  her  (Menendez Pelayo, Los Heterodoxos Espa–oles, 1881, vol. V.). Ignatius Loyola, while studying at Salamanca (1527) was brought before an ecclesiastical commission on a charge of sympathy with the alumbrados, but escaped with an admonition. Others where not so fortunate. In 1529 a congregation of unlettered adherents  at Toledo was visited with scourging and imprisonment. Greater rigouts followed, and for about a century the alumbrados afforded many victims to the Inquisition, especially at Cordova. The movement  (under the name Illumints) seems to have reached France from Seville in 1625, and obtained some propertions in Picardy when  (1634) by Pierre Guerin, cure of Saint-Georges de Roye, whose followers, known as Guerinets,  were suppressed in 1635. (Herman hist. des keresies, 1717)  Another and more obscure body of Illumines came to light in the south of France in 1722, and appears to have lingered till 1794, having affinities with those known contemporaneously in this country as ‘French Prophets’, an offshoot of the Camisards. Of A different class were the so-called  Illuminati, better know as Rosicrucians, who claimed to originate in 1422,
The designation illuminati was also in use from the 14th century by the Brethren of the Free Spirit, and in the 15th century was assumed by other enthusiasts who claimed that the illuminating light came, not by being communicated from an authoritative but secret source, but from within, the result of exalted consciousness, or "enlightenment". Alumbrados of Spain To the former class belong the alumbrados of Spain. The historian Marcelino Menendez y Pelayo found the name as early as 1492 (in the form iluminados, 1498), but traced them to a Gnostic origin, and thought their views were promoted in Spain through influences from Italy. One of their earliest leaders, born in Salamanca, a laborer's daughter known as La Beata de Piedrahita, came under the notice of the Inquisition in 1511, as claiming to hold colloquies with Jesus and the Virgin Mary; some high patronage saved her from a rigorous denunciation. (Menendez Pelayo, Los Heterodoxos Espa–oles, 1881, vol. V.). Ignatius Loyola, while studying at Salamanca in 1527, was brought before an ecclesiastical commission on a charge of sympathy with the alumbrados, but escaped with an admonition. Illumines of France The movement (under the name of Illumines) seems to have reached France from Seville in 1623, and attained some following in Picardy when joined (1634) by Pierce Guerin, cure of Saint-Georges de Roye, whose followers, known as Gurinets, were suppressed in 1635. A century later, another, more obscure body of Illumines came to light in the south of France in 1722, and appears to have lingered till 1794, having affinities with those known contemporaneously in Britain as 'French Prophets', an offshoot of the Camisards. Rosicrucians A different class were the Rosicrucians, who claimed to originate in 1407, but rose into notice in 1614 when their main text Fama Fraternitatis appeared; a secret society, that claimed to combine the possession of esoteric principles of religion with the mysteries of alchemy. Their positions are embodied in three anonymous treatises of 1614 (mentioned in Richard and Giraud, Dictionnaire universel des sciences ecclesiastiques, Paris 1825), as well as in the Confessio Fraternitatis of 1615. Rosicrucians also claimed heritage from the Knights Templar. Martinists Later, the title Illuminati was applied to the French Martinists which had been founded in 1754 by Martinez Pasqualis, and to their imitators the Russian Martinists, headed about 1790 by Professor Schwartz of Moscow; both were occultist cabalists and allegorists, absorbing eclectic ideas from Jakob Boehme and Emanuel Swedenborg.
(Continued) but rose into notice in 1537; a secret society, combining with the mysteries of alchemy the possession of esoteric principles of religion . Their positions are embodied in three anonymous treatises of 1614 (Richard et Giraud, Dictionnaire universel des sciences ecclesiastiques, Paris 1825). A short-lived movement of republican free-thought, to the whose adherents the name Illuminati was given, was founded May-day 1776 by Adam Weishaupt (d. 1830), professor of  Cannon Law at Ingolstadt, ex-Jesuit. The title of this order or society was Perfertibilisit  (Perfektibilisten). Its member, pledged to obedience to their superiors, we’re divided into three main classes; the first included “novices” “minervals” and “lesser Illuminati”; the second consisting of free masons,  “ordinary” “Scottish” and “Scottish knights”; the third or “mystery” class comprising two  grades of “priest” and “regent” and of “magus” and “king.” Relations with Masonic lodges were established at Munich and Freudian in 1780. The order had it branches in most countries of the European continent, but it’s total number never seem to have exceased two thousand. The scheme had its attraction for literary men, such as Goethe and Herder, and even form the reigning dukes Gotha and Weimar. Internal rupture preceded its downfall in 1785.  Later, the title Illuminati was given  to the French Martinists, founded in 1754 by Martinez Pasqualis, and to their imitators the Russian Martinists, headed about 1790 by Professor Schwartz of Moscow; both were Cabalists and allegorists, imbibing ideas from Jakob Boehme and Emanuel Swedenborg. – Encyclopedia Brittanica, Vol. 14, 1911 page 320

“The great strength of our Order lies in its concealment; let it never appear in any place in its own name, but always covered by another name, and another occupation. None is fitter than the three lower degrees of Free Masonry; the public is accustomed to it, expects little from it, and therefore takes little notice of it.

Next to this, the form of a learned or literary society is best suited to our purpose, and had Free Masonry not existed, this cover would have been employed; and it may be much more than a cover, it may be a powerful engine in our hands. By establishing reading societies, and subscription libraries, and taking these under our direction, and supplying them through our labors, we may turn the public mind which way we will.

In like manner we must try to obtain an influence in the military academies (this may be of mighty consequence) the printing-houses, booksellers’ shops, chapters, and in short in all offices which have any effect, either in forming, or in managing, or even in directing the mind of man: painting and engraving are highly worth our care.”-Adam Weishaupt (from John Robinson’s “Proofs of a Conspiracy” p. 112)


The “Lion King” is telling the story of the opposing forces of the Illuminati.

Advertisements

10 thoughts on “Illuminati”

  1. Thanks for your input for the ‘video’ I posted earlier. I’m aware of the different ‘branches’ of them, but it does not concern me where I ‘begin’… I will actually be posting much more about this subject.

    1. I have started to myself. Right now I am trying to find document that provides evidence Ignatius Loyola, founder of the The Jesuits (Society of Jesus), while studying at Salamanca (1527) was a leader of the alumbrados. Yes he was changed with being friends with them and aiding them but I can not find hard facts. To show more

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s