Andrés Bonifacio

Andrés Bonifacio y de Castro (November 30, 1863 – May 10, 1897) was a Filipino nationalist and revolutionary leader. He is often called "the Father of the Philippine Revolution". He was a founder and later Supremo ("supreme leader") of the Kataas-taasan, Kagalang-galangang Katipunan ng mga Anak ng Bayan or simply and more popularly called Katipunan, a movement which sought the independence of the Philippines from Spanish colonial rule and started the Philippine Revolution. He is considered a de facto national hero of the Philippines, and is also considered by some Filipino historians to be the first President of the Philippines (through the revolutionary government he established), but officially he is not recognized as such.
Andrés Bonifacio y de Castro (November 30, 1863 – May 10, 1897) was a Filipino nationalist and revolutionary leader. He is often called “the Father of the Philippine Revolution”. Seen here with his Masonic Apron.

He is considered a de facto national hero of the Philippines, and is also considered by some Filipino historians to be the first President of the Philippines (through the revolutionary government he established), but officially he is not recognized as such.


Freemasonry

Called the “Great Plebeian”, Andres Bonifacio joined the Freemasonry in 1892 and was a member of Taliba Lodge (Logia Taliba) No. 165 under the Gran Oriente Españolheaded by Jose Dizon. He took the Masonic name “Sinukuan” which means “the one who conquered”.

A Lodge was named in his honor, Andres Bonifacio Lodge No. 199, Under the Jurisdiction of the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of Free and Accepted Mason of the Philippines.


The Katipunan

He was a founder and later Supremo (“supreme leader”) of the Kataas-taasan, Kagalang-galangang Katipunan ng mga Anak ng Bayan or simply and more popularly called Katipunan (abbreviated to KKK), which was a movement which sought the independence of the Philippines from Spanish colonial rule and started the Philippine Revolution. It was an organization of Freemasons.

 

 

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