William Shakespeare

An English poet, playwright and actor, widely regarded as the greatest writer in the English language and the world’s pre-eminent dramatist. He is often called England’s national poet and the “Bard of Avon”.-From Wikipedia

Shakespeare spent most of his life in his hometown of Stratford, England where there was no educational establishments of any renown. There’s no evidence he ever left England for any length of time, if at all.

In his will he left no books, manuscripts or unpublished works to anybody. He left no books to anyone; apparently he owned few-if any- and didn’t maintain any kind of library. Both Shakespeare’s parents and daughter were illiterate. He was involved in many “petty businesses” in his adult life including “money lending” and a small brewing business.

“There are no authentic portraits of Shakspere in existence. The dissimilarities the Droeshout, Chandos, Janssen, Hunt, Ashbourne, Soest, and Dunford portraits prove conclusively that the artists were unaware of Shakspere’s actual features. An examination of the Droeshout portrait discloses several peculiarities“- The Secret Teachings of All Ages by Manly P. Hall

“The Great Folio of 1623 is a veritable treasure house of Masonic lore and symbolism, and the time is at hand when that Great Work should be accorded the consideration which is its due.. “- The Secret Teachings of All Ages by Manly P. Hall

“The philosophic ideals promulgated throughout the Shakespearian plays distinctly demonstrate their author to have been thoroughly familiar with certain doctrines and tenets peculiar to Rosicrucianism; in fact the profundity of the Shakespearian productions stamps their creator as one of the illuminati of the ages.” – The Secret Teachings of All Ages by Manly P. Hall


Handwriting

“There are in existence but six known examples of Shakspere’s handwriting. All are signatures, and three of them are in his will. The scrawling, uncertain method of their execution stamps Shakspere as unfamiliar with the use of a pen, and it is obvious either that he copied a signature prepared for him or that his hand was guided while he wrote. No autograph manuscripts of the “Shakespearian” plays or sonnets have been discovered“- The Secret Teachings of All Ages by Manly P. Hall

The six examples are all legal documents which are: a deposition in the Bellott v. Mountjoy case, dated May 11, 1612 the purchase of a house in Blackfriars, London, dated March 10, 1613 the mortgage of the same house, dated March 11, 1613 his Last Will and Testament, which contains three signatures, one on each page, dated March 25, 1616 The signatures appear as follows: Willm Shakp William Shakspēr Wm Shakspē William Shakspere Willm Shakspere By me William Shakspeare
The six examples are all legal documents which are:
a deposition in the Bellott v. Mountjoy case, dated May 11, 1612
the purchase of a house in Blackfriars, London, dated March 10, 1613
the mortgage of the same house, dated March 11, 1613
his Last Will and Testament, which contains three signatures, one on each page, dated March 25, 1616
The signatures appear as follows:
Willm Shakp
William Shakspēr
Wm Shakspē
William Shakspere
Willm Shakspere
By me William Shakspeare

Francis Bacon As William Shakespeare

“…enthusiasts who for years have struggled to identify Sir Francis Bacon as the true “Bard of Avon” might long since have won their case had they emphasized its most important angle, namely, that Sir Francis Bacon, the Rosicrucian initiate, wrote into the Shakespearian plays the secret teachings of the Fraternity of R.C. and the true rituals of the Freemasonic Order, of which order it may yet be discovered that he was the actual founder.”- The Secret Teachings of All Ages by Manly P. Hall

“Abundant cryptographic proof exists that Bacon was concerned in the production of the Shakespearian plays. Sir Francis Bacon’s cipher number was 33. In the First Part of King Henry the Fourth, the word “Francis” appears 33 times upon one page. To attain this end, obviously awkward sentences were required, as: “Anon Francis? No Francis, but tomorrow Francis: or Francis, on Thursday: or indeed Francis when thou wilt. But Francis.” Throughout the Shakespearian Folios and Quartos occur scores of acrostic signatures. The simplest form of the acrostic is that whereby a name–in these instances Bacon’s—was hidden in the first few letters of lines. In The Tempest, Act I, Scene 2, appears a striking example of the Baconian acrostic:

“Begun to tell me what I am, but stopt

And left me to a bootelesse Inquisition,

Concluding, stay: not yet.

The first letters of the first and second lines together with the first three letters of the third line form the word BACon. Similar acrostics appear frequently in Bacon’s acknowledged writings. “- The Secret Teachings of All Ages by Manly P. Hall

“In all probability, the keys to the Baconian riddle will be found in classical mythology. He who understands the secret of the Seven-Rayed God will comprehend the method employed by Bacon to accomplish his monumental labor. Aliases were assumed by him in accordance with the attributes and order of the members of the planetary system. One of the least known–but most important–keys to the Baconian enigma is the Third, or 1637, Edition, published in Paris, of Les Images ou Tableaux de platte peinture des deux Philostrates sophistes grecs et les statues de Callistrate, by Blaise de Vigenere. The title page of this volume–which, as the name of the author when properly deciphered indicates, was written by or under the direction of Bacon or his secret society–is one mass of important Masonic or Rosicrucian symbols. On page 486 appears a plate entitled “Hercules Furieux,” showing a gigantic figure shaking a spear, the ground before him strewn with curious emblems. In his curious work, Das Bild des Speershüttlers die Lösung des Shakespeare-Rätsels, Alfred Freund attempts to explain the Baconian symbolism in the Philostrates. Bacon he reveals as the philosophical Hercules, whom time will establish as the true “Spear-Shaker” (Shakespeare). “- The Secret Teachings of All Ages by Manly P. Hall

The only known portraits of Shakespeare match exactly those of Francis Bacon.

The only Shakespeare notebook, a collection of expressions, phrases, and sentences, many of which appear in the Shakespeare plays. This is the Promus, written by Francis Bacon.


“So far as anybody actually knows and can prove, Shakespeare of Stratford-on-Avon never wrote a play in his life.” … “Shall I set down the rest of the Conjectures which constitute the giant Biography of William Shakespeare? It would strain the Unabridged Dictionary to hold them. He is a Brontosaur: nine bones and six hundred barrels of plaster of Paris.” “Isn’t it odd, when you think of it, that you may list all of the celebrated Englishmen, Irishmen, Scotchmen … clear back to the first Tudors — a list of five hundred names, shall we say? — and you can … learn the particulars of the lives of every one of them. Every one of them except one — the most famous, the most renowned — by far the most illustrious of them all — Shakespeare!” — Mark Twain “Is Shakespeare Dead?” My Autobiography (1909).

“I think [an alternative candidate] wrote Shakespeare. If you don’t, there are some awfully funny coincidences to explain away.” — Orson Welles Persona Grata, Cecil Beaton and Kenneth Tynan (1953) 98

“I am firm against Shaksper — I mean the Avon man, the actor.” — With Walt Whitman, Traubel

“Conceived out of the fullest heat and pulse of European feudalism — personifying in unparall’d ways the medieval aristocracy, its towering spirit of ruthless and gigantic cast, its own peculiar air and arrogance (no mere imitation) — only one of the ‘wolfish earls’ so plenteous in the plays themselves, or some born descendent and knower, might seem to be the true author of those amazing works — works in some respects greater than anything else in recorded history.” — Walt Whitman “November Boughs”

“In the work of the greatest geniuses, humble beginnings will reveal themselves somewhere, but one cannot trace the slightest sign of them in Shakespeare … I am not concerned with who wrote the works of Shakespeare … but I can hardly think it was the Stratford boy. Whoever wrote them had an aristocratic attitude.” — Charles “Charlie” Chaplin My Autobiography, 364

“It is a great comfort, to my way of thinking, that so little is known concerning the poet. The life of Shakespeare is a fine mystery and I tremble every day lest something turn up.” — Charles Dickens Complete Writings 37:206

“I no longer believe that William Shakespeare the actor from Stratford was the author of the works that have been ascribed to him.” — Sigmund Freud Autobiographical Study (1927), 130

“It is undeniably painful to all of us that even now we do not know who was the author of the Comedies, Tragedies and Sonnets of Shakespeare, whether it was in fact the untutored son of the provincial citizen of Stratford, who attained a modest position as an actor in London … ” — Sigmund Freud Speech accepting the Goethe Prize, 1930. Quoted in Shakespeare’s Lives (1970) 609.


The Lion King got inspirations from William Shakespeare’s Hamlet.


 

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