Statue of Liberty

 

Showen above is The Statue of Liberty which is a colossal neoclassical sculpture on Liberty Island in the middle of New York Harbor, in Manhattan, New York City.
Showen above is The Statue of Liberty which is a colossal neoclassical sculpture on Liberty Island in the middle of New York Harbor, in Manhattan, New York City.

It was a gift given to America by the French Freemasons, not the government of France, after being rejected Egyptian government. The three major figures involved with the Statue, Frederic Bartholdi who designed the statue itself, Gustave Eiffel who designed the inner support structure later to be famous for the 984-feet (300-meter) high Eiffel Tower, and Richard Hunt who designed the pedestal, were all Freemasons. The original name of the statue was “Liberty Enlightening the World,” not the Statue of Liberty.  Enlightening, enlightenment, light, the sun, intelligence, bright, brilliance, Lucifer, the Light-bearer!

The torch  represents the torch of Prometheus, who occutly signifies Lucifer.  The Greek mythological story of Prometheus is the same allegory of stealing fire or knowledge from the Gods, and giving it to humans, thus angering God.

The Statue of Liberty itself is essentially a modern version of the Colossus of Rhodes, which was a depiction of the Greek sun god Helios.


 

This plaque was mounted inside the pedestal of the statute with a poem. The Statue of Liberty poem is titled New Colossus and its famous last lines have become part of American history. Here is the sonnet in its entirety: The New Colossus Not like the brazen giant of Greek fame, With conquering limbs astride from land to land; Here at our sea-washed, sunset gates shall stand A mighty woman with a torch, whose flame Is the imprisoned lightning, and her name Mother of Exiles. From her beacon-hand Glows world-wide welcome; her mild eyes command The air-bridged harbor that twin cities frame. "Keep, ancient lands, your storied pomp!" cries she With silent lips. "Give me your tired, your poor, Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free, The wretched refuse of your teeming shore. Send these, the homeless, tempest-tossed to me, I lift my lamp beside the golden door!"
This plaque was mounted inside the pedestal of the statute with a poem. The Statue of Liberty poem is titled New Colossus and its famous last lines have become part of American history. Here is the sonnet in its entirety:
The New Colossus
Not like the brazen giant of Greek fame,
With conquering limbs astride from land to land;
Here at our sea-washed, sunset gates shall stand
A mighty woman with a torch, whose flame
Is the imprisoned lightning, and her name
Mother of Exiles. From her beacon-hand
Glows world-wide welcome; her mild eyes command
The air-bridged harbor that twin cities frame.
“Keep, ancient lands, your storied pomp!” cries she
With silent lips. “Give me your tired, your poor,
Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free,
The wretched refuse of your teeming shore.
Send these, the homeless, tempest-tossed to me,
I lift my lamp beside the golden door!”

 

There is also a Masonic cornerstone ceremony and this plaque placed on the site as well. Here the original name of the statue can be seen “Liberty Enlightening the World”.
There is also a Masonic cornerstone ceremony and this plaque placed on the site as well. Here the original name of the statue can be seen “Liberty Enlightening the World”.

 

Above is pictured A near mirror image of the Statue of Liberty in France, also on an island, in the Seine River in Paris that was set up in 1889. There are actually hundreds of enormous “Statues of Liberty” all around the world.
Above is pictured A near mirror image of the Statue of Liberty in France, also on an island, in the Seine River in Paris that was set up in 1889. There are actually hundreds of enormous “Statues of Liberty” all around the world.
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6 thoughts on “Statue of Liberty”

  1. Pingback: Lucifer | The Rose

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